Posts from the ‘MILITARY HISTORY’ Category

ADM. ERIC T. OLSON-NAVY SEAL

Olson Picked to Lead U.S. Special Operations Command

TOOLBOXPresident Bush today nominated Navy Vice Adm. Eric T. Olson to lead U.S. Special Operations Command, replacing Army Gen. Bryan “Doug” Brown, according to a Pentagon release.

Olson would be the first Navy officer to head Socom. The command is responsible for about 48,000 elite troops, such as Army Green Berets, Rangers, Delta Force operatives, Navy SEALs and Air Force rescue teams. Olson is now Socom’s deputy commander.

Socom’s influence and budget — projected at more than $6 billion for 2008 — have grown since Sept. 11, 2001. In 2004, Bush designated Socom as the lead military organization for combating terrorism. In recent years, about 80 percent of deployed Special Operations forces have been engaged in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Olson, a longtime Navy SEAL, has served in Israel, Egypt and Tunisia. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1973 and received the Distinguished Service Medal and the Silver Star.

Brown intends to retire this summer, military officials said.

Olson’s nomination marks another step in the recent turnover of key commanders involved in the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Adm. William J. Fallon this spring replaced Gen. John P. Abizaid as head of Central Command, which oversees the Middle East, and Gen. David H. Petraeus succeeded Gen. George W. Casey Jr. as the top commander in Iraq.

One key military leader is likely to remain in his post. Bush is expected to nominate Marine Gen. Peter Pace to serve a second two-year term as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Associated Press reported yesterday.

“It would not be a surprise,” a military official said yesterday.

If confirmed, Pace — who served four years as vice chairman before becoming chairman in 2005 — would exceed the six-year limit for those positions. However, the limit does not apply in wartime and the president can override it “in the national interest.”

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U.S. NAVY SEALS

A WARRIOR’S SONG

THE FLAG CODE

WE ARE A NATION IN GREAT DISTRESS!! It is in NO WAY a sign of disrespect to our great Flag to do this! Pass it around! WE NEED TO MAKE A STATEMENT, and they are NOT LISTENING TO US!! Maybe they’ll get a little frightened if they see this on MILLIONS OF HOMES across our great Country!

Here is the relevant part of the US Code of Laws regarding how to fly the flag when in distress:

THE FLAG CODE
Title 36, U.S.C., Chapter 10
As amended by P.L. 344, 94th Congress
Approved July 7, 1976

§ 176. Respect for flag: No disrespect should be shown to the flag of the United States of America; the flag should not be dipped to any person or thing. Regimental colors, State flags, and organization or institutional flags are to be dipped as a mark of honor.

(a) The flag should never be displayed with the union down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.

Most individuals who have served in the military service of our nation will (or should) recognize this signal.

Lets make sure that those in Washington that are supposed to be serving us RECOGNIZE OUR DISTRESS!

A SOLDIER’S CHRISTMAS

A SOLDIER’S CHRISTMAS

Soldiers Christmas

‘Twas the night before Christmas, he lived all alone,
in a one bedroom house made of plaster and stone.

I had come down the chimney with presents to give,
and to see just who in this little house lived.

As I looked all about, a strange sight I did see,
No tinsel, no presents, not even a tree.

No Stockings by mantle, just boots filled with sand,
On the wall hung pictures of far distant lands.

With medals and badges, awards of all kinds,
A sobering thought came through my mind.

For this house was different, it was dark and dreary,
The home of a soldier, I could now see clearly.

The soldier lay sleeping, silent, alone,
Curled up on the floor in this one bedroom home.

The face was so gentle, the room in such disorder,
Not how I picture a United States Soldier.

Was this the hero of whom I’d just read?
Curled up on a poncho, the floor for a bed?

I realized the families that I saw this night,
owed their lives to these soldiers who were willing to fight.

Soon round the world, the children would play,
and grownups would celebrate a bright Christmas day.

They all enjoyed freedom each month of the year,
because of the soldiers, like the one lying here.

I couldn’t help wondering how many lay alone,
on a cold Christmas Eve in a land far from home.

The very thought brought a tear to my eye,
I dropped to one knee and started to cry.

The soldier awakened and I heard a rough voice,
“Santa don’t cry, for this life is my choice”.

I fight for freedom, I don’t ask for more,
My life is my God, my country, my corps.”

The soldier rolled over and drifted to sleep,
I couldn’t control it, I continued to weep.

I kept watch for hours, so silent and still,
as we both shivered from the cold night’s chill.

I didn’t want to leave, on that cold, dark night,
this guardian of honor, so willing to fight.

Then the soldier rolled over, with a voice soft and pure,
whispered, “Carry on Santa…., It’s Christmas Day…., All is secure.

One look at my watch, and I knew he was right,
Merry Christmas my friend…. and to all a Good Night.

~ Author Unknown *~

posted on boudicabpi.boudica.us

Posted in America, Christ, Christmas, Our troops in Afghanistan, Our troops in Iraq, U. S. Army, U. S. Coast guard, U. S. Marines, U. s. Air Force, Uncategorized, Veterans, defense, freedom, liberty, military, religios holidays | No Comments »

FOUNDER OF OATH KEEPERS

Stewart is the founder and Director of Oath Keepers. He served as a U.S. Army paratrooper until disabled in a rough terrain parachuting accident during a night jump. He is a former firearms instructor and former member of Rep. Ron Paul’s DC staff. Stewart graduated from Yale Law School in 2004, where his paper “Solving the Puzzle of Enemy Combatant Status” won Yale’s Miller prize for best paper on the Bill of Rights. He assisted teaching U.S. military history at Yale, was a Yale Research Scholar, and is writing a book on the dangers of applying the laws of war to the American people. He is a staff attorney with Jefferson Legal Foundation and has assisted in constitutional litigation in state and federal courts. Stewart currently writes the monthly Enemy at the Gates column for S.W.A.T. Magazine, and has written for The Warrior, the journal of Gerry Spence’s Trial Lawyer’s College; for http://www.moreliberty.org; and for JPFO. Stewart has appeared on several radio shows, was invited to speak at Stanford University on unlawful enemy combatant status, and teaches classes on the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

His personal blog is here and has loads of info:
http://stewart-rhodes.blogspot.com/

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